NBA coaches with at least 200 wins and a .500 winning percentage who have not won a Championship!

NBA coaches with at least 200 wins and a .500 winning percentage who have not won a championship title, by number of playoff wins and finals appearances

  REG. SEASON PLAYOFFS
COACH YEARS WINS WIN% WINS FINALS
Jerry Sloan 26 1,221 .603 98 2
George Karl 27 1,175 .588 80 1
Rick Adelman 23 1,042 .582 79 2
Don Nelson 31 1,335 .557 75 0
Mike D’Antoni 16 668 .561 49 0
Stan Van Gundy 12 523 .577 48 1
Scott Brooks 11 486 .568 48 1
John MacLeod 18 707 .518 47 1
Flip Saunders 17 654 .525 47 0
Mike Brown 8 347 .616 47 1
Jeff Van Gundy 11 430 .575 44 1
Del Harris 14 556 .549 38 1
Cotton Fitzsimmons 21 832 .518 35 0
Doug Moe 15 628 .543 33 0
Fred Schaus 7 315 .563 33 0
Frank Vogel 9 353 .536 31 0
Joe Lapchick 9 326 .569 30 0
Mike Budenholzer 7 326 .585 27 0
Paul Westphal 10 318 .533 27 1
Brad Stevens 7 313 .563 27 0
Richie Guerin 8 327 .529 26 0
Tom Thibodeau 8 352 .589 24 0
Doug Collins 11 442 .521 23 0
Avery Johnson 7 254 .577 23 1
Dwane Casey 11 434 .524 21 0
Butch van Breda Kolff 9 266 .513 21 0
Mike Fratello 17 667 .549 20 0
Terry Stotts 12 469 .508 20 0
Stan Albeck 7 307 .535 18 0
Nate McMillan 16 655 .528 17 0
Bob Hill 9 310 .514 17 0
Billy Donovan 5 239 .610 15 0
Paul Seymour 8 271 .529 14 0
Kevin McHale 7 232 .556 13 0
Quin Snyder 6 268 .565 10 0
Vinny Del Negro 5 210 .533 10 0
Mike Malone 7 255 .511 7 0
Allan Bristow 5 207 .505 5 0

Vacation Webcams

Here’s a little virtual trip to some favorite places:

Reykjavik, Iceland ❯ Feel a little calmer with a peek at this quaint waterfront street in Iceland’s capital city.

Easter Island ❯ Watch the mysterious moai statues stand sentinel on the island as the waves slowly roll in.

Marlborough Sounds, New Zealand ❯ Imagine standing on the shore in Picton and watching the boats sail these age-old sunken valleys.

Cinque Terre, Italy ❯ Step into a fantasy of seeing the five seaside villages of Cinque Terre, where you can almost taste the pesto.

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HOT: The Guardian

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News from Around the World

Monet, 1879

In 1879, Claude Monet moved with his family to the village of Vétheuil on the north bank of the River Seine. For the next three years the town became the artist’s central landscape motif. His style during this period evolved from the blunt, broad strokes of the 1870s to delicate, rhythmic brushwork that reads like a gauze of spun sugar. The poplars in the background appear as twirling configurations of blue and green, while the clouds are painted in a broad and wet manner that suggests the flat quality of the sky at midday.

Climate Change best Bets / 2019 version

Don’t feel like watching that holiday movie you’ve already seen 900 times? Then gather ’round to learn about a topic even more timely than Christmas cookies and the dreidel song: our warming planet.

In addition to the best-known titles, like “An Inconvenient Truth” and its sequel, “Chasing Ice,” and Leonardo DiCaprio’s “Before the Flood” and “Ice on Fire,” here are five documentaries to try. Don’t worry about spoiling the holiday mood: Most of them end on an inspiring note.

“Years of Living Dangerously”

This series, featuring celebrity correspondents like Matt Damon and Olivia Munn, is a favorite of the climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe. Not only because it discusses climate impacts and solutions, but also because it tackles two huge myths: first, that climate change is a “distant issue,” and, second, that we can only fix climate change by “destroying the economy or our personal liberties.”

“Merchants of Doubt”

If you’ve ever wondered how the climate debate became, well, a debate, then this intriguing and infuriating film is for you. Based on a book by Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway, it draws a parallel between the tactics of Big Tobacco and Big Oil, revealing the world of politics, spin and public opinion.

“Mission Blue”

Besides highlighting the work of the oceanographer Sylvia Earle, a National Geographic explorer-in-residence, this film also paints a picture of the devastating changes she has witnessed during her decades underwater. Xiye Bastida, a 17-year-old activist and organizer for Fridays For Future NYC, said it “shows the power we have as individuals to connect with nature and speak for nature.”

“This Changes Everything”

Inspired by Naomi Klein’s 2014 book of the same name, this documentary “aims to empower,” rather than scare, viewers into action. “The film tells moving, personal stories,” said Keya Chatterjee, executive director of the U.S. Climate Action Network, “but weaves them into a larger story about how colonialism and greed got us into this crisis, and also how people-power and disruption will get us out.”

“Racing Extinction”

Unless drastic changes are made, some biologists estimate we could lose up to 50 percent of Earth’s species within the next century. That devastating fact — a potential sixth extinction, wherein “humanity has become the asteroid” — is the basis for this fast-paced, wide-ranging film from Louie Psihoyos, who won an Oscar for “The Cove.” While some scenes are tough to watch, they’re balanced with awe-inspiring nature shots that showcase a world worth saving.

Source: New York Times email

Meet the 32-year-old wealth detective who finds the hidden money of the super rich

“Gabriel Zucman started his first real job the Monday after the collapse of Lehman Brothers. Fresh from the Paris School of Economics, where he’d studied with a professor named Thomas Piketty, Zucman had lined up an internship at Exane, the French brokerage firm. He joined a team writing commentary for clients and was given a task that felt absurd: Explain the shattering of the global economy. “Nobody knew what was going on,” he recalls.

 
 

At that moment, Zucman was also pondering whether to pursue a doctorate. He was already skeptical of mainstream economics. Now the dismal science looked more than ever like a batch of elaborate theories that had no relevance outside academia. But one day, as the crisis rolled on, he encountered data showing billions of dollars moving into and out of big economies and smaller ones such as Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, Hong Kong, and Singapore. He’d never seen studies of these flows before. “Surely if I spend enough time I can understand what the story behind it is,” he remembers thinking. “We economists can be a little bit useful.”

Bloomberg article.

Satellite Shootdown Fraud

The Defense Department claims it is planning to shoot down a rogue ultra-secret spy satellite because the fuel onboard poses a danger to people on the ground.

This explanation is so transparent it is almost laughable. The likelihood of being injured by the satellite has been calculated as something like one in a trillion, whereas being hit by lightning is somewhat more likely: one in 1.2 million.

The real reason for the shootdown attempt?

1) Components from the ultra-secret spy satellite could survive the re-entry and be recovered by bad guys.

or

2) It is a perfect opportunity to test the U.S. missile to satellite intercept capabilities.

or

3) Both

We’ve learned a lesson starting back in 1960, when President Eisenhower lied to the American people and to the world that the crash of Gary Power’s U2 over the USSR was a “weather balloon.”

Ike got caught with his hand in the cookie jar. Ever since then, we’ve come to the realization that sometimes we have to take what our government says with a very, very large grain of salt

Congress Breaks Congress by Taking Too many Breaks.

Senator Arlen Specter once said something intriguing when asked what recommendations he would make for improving Senate procedures. He suggested, sotto voce, that Senators should work longer.
By his account, Senators start their week mid-day Tuesday with luncheon meetings and by Thursday afternoon they are itching to get back to their home states. By Friday most of them have fled the Capital City for Reagan Airport.
To backup this plaint, the official numbers are now in: The Senate met for a meager 126 days during the past legislative year; the House met for a paltry 93 days.
We shan’t say this is a “Do Nothing” Congress reminiscent of President Truman’s complaint made decades ago. (Shall we?)
But it seems true indeed that legislators have been presiding over a “Do little, in very little time” Congress.